SEARCH:  
Twitter Facebook RSS Feed
No Sacred Cows  
Toby Young
Thursday 8th August 2019

Donald Trump isn’t to blame for America’s mass shootings


The BBC’s flagship news and current affairs programme wasn’t in any doubt about who to blame for America’s latest bout of mass shootings. Newsnight’s report began with footage of Donald Trump addressing the faithful at a rally. ‘This is an invasion,’ he warned, referring to the refugees massing on the Mexican border. ‘When you see these caravans starting out with 20,000 people, that’s an invasion.’ It then cut to Emily Maitlis in the studio. ‘That was in May,’ she said. ‘Today, Donald Trump called on Americans to condemn racism, bigotry and white supremacy.’ She added that the President had made these remarks ‘with a straight face’ and ‘with autocue precision’ — completely insincere, in other words – and then pointed out that he had not suggested any new measures for gun control. She concluded: ‘So how much should we align presidential words and terrorist acts? How should America react to a man many blame for amplifying extremism in the first place?’

Those are good questions and it’s a pity Newsnight didn’t take them seriously. There are plenty of reasons not to blame Trump for last weekend’s slaughter. For one thing, the El Paso gunman railed against climate change alongside Hispanic immigration in the manifesto he published before murdering 22 people, and the President is a climate change sceptic, as liberals never tire of pointing out. For another, the Dayton shooter, who murdered nine, was a self-described ‘leftist’ who praised Elizabeth Warren and Antifa, the far-left protest group. Incidentally, the terrorist who charged an ICE detention centre with homemade bombs and a rifle last month was a member of Antifa and referred to his target as a ‘concentration camp’, echoing the words of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the Democratic Congresswoman. Yet Newsnight didn’t ask whether the ‘inflammatory rhetoric’ of Warren or Ocasio-Cortez ‘inspired’ these nutjobs. No, it bought into the line peddled by Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke — and countless others — that all mass killings that have taken place on Trump’s watch have been by ‘white supremacists’. (To read more, click here.)

COMMENT | COMMENTS SO FAR: 1 [ FIXED LINK ] Bookmark and Share





Wednesday 7th August 2019

London Calling: Guns and Political Ammo


Click here to listen to ⁦‪James Delingpole‬⁩ and me discussing the mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, why Trump obviously isn’t responsible and whether his political opponents know that and are blaming him for opportunistic political reasons, or actually believe their own soundbites.

COMMENT | COMMENTS SO FAR: 0 [ FIXED LINK ] Bookmark and Share





Wednesday 7th August 2019

What could be more delusional than a 'Government of National Unity' led by hardcore Remainers?


At times, it’s hard not to feel sorry for die-hard Remainers. The latest straw they’ve been clutching at – paper straw, mind you, not plastic – has just been wrenched from their grasp by John McDonnell, scrumpled up into a little ball and then tossed, nonchalantly, into his mouth like a peanut.

At the Edinburgh Fringe Festival yesterday, the Shadow Chancellor told Iain Dale that Labour “wouldn’t enter into coalitions or pacts” if the Government is brought down by a vote of no confidence when Parliament returns in September. In those circumstances, his Party’s priority would be to establish a Labour government led by Jeremy Corbyn. And if that proves impossible – as it surely would – the only alternative would be a General Election.

So that puts the kybosh on a “Government of National Unity”, which Remainers have been pinning their hopes on. Without the backing of the Labour leadership, there’s simply no way an anti-Brexit coalition could win a vote of confidence in the House of Commons. It is now crystal clear that if Boris’s Government is brought down in September that will mean a General Election – and one that he will almost certainly win, given the disarray among his opponents.(To read more, click here.)

COMMENT | COMMENTS SO FAR: 0 [ FIXED LINK ] Bookmark and Share





Monday 5th August 2019

Should the Brexiteers try and form an electoral pact?


In the wake of the Lib Dems’ victory in last week’s Brecon and Radnorshire by-election, there’s been a lot of talk on the Remain side about the need for an electoral pact between the anti-Brexit parties. After all, the Lib Dem candidate only beat the Conservative incumbent by a margin of 1,425 votes, so wouldn’t have won if the Greens and Plaid Cymru hadn’t agreed to stand down.

On Saturday, the independent MP Heidi Allen wrote a piece for the Guardian, promoting her ‘Unite to Remain’ initiative, which aims to build a cross-party ‘Remain Alliance’ across the United Kingdom, and the Observer ran a story on its front page yesterday saying the People’s Vote campaign has drawn up a list of 100 marginals in which it will advise Remain supporters which anti-Brexit candidate to vote for, regardless of which party they belong to.

In light of these initiatives, some people on my side of the aisle, such as Brexit Party chairman Richard Tice, have argued for an electoral pact between the Conservatives and the Brexit Party. I’ve written before about why I think a formal pact along those lines is unlikely – and it’s been ruled out by both Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson – but that doesn’t mean an informal, grass-roots alliance isn’t worth trying. Something like what the People’s Vote campaign has in mind, except advising Brexit supporters which candidate to vote for in key marginals to secure our exit from the European Union, regardless of whether they belong to the Conservative Party, the Brexit Party or even the Labour Party. (To read more, click here.)

COMMENT | COMMENTS SO FAR: 0 [ FIXED LINK ] Bookmark and Share





Monday 5th August 2019

The TV licence fee has to go


As a thought experiment, let’s imagine that Labour wins the next General Election. In fairly short order, many British companies start going out of business, including Hovis Ltd.

So Jeremy Corbyn decides to take it into public ownership. But the Labour apparatchiks in Whitehall know nothing about running a business – shock! – and Hovis quickly starts losing a great deal of money.

Then John McDonnell comes up with a brainwave: Why not impose a toaster tax? Henceforth, anyone who owns a toaster will have to pay an annual fee of £154.50 and the money this raises will then be spent on subsidizing Hovis.

Doesn’t matter if you would no more dream of putting a slice of Hovis in your toaster than a piece of cardboard – you still have to fork out £154.50 a year. If you refuse, it’ll be off to the Scrubs with you, where, if you’re lucky, you can join Rod Liddle, Douglas Murray and me in the journalists’ wing. (To read more, click here.)

COMMENT | COMMENTS SO FAR: 0 [ FIXED LINK ] Bookmark and Share





Sunday 4th August 2019

Why I want to start a free speech trade union


Last April, the historian Niall Ferguson called for a NATO of the pen. Inspired by the 1949 North Atlantic Treaty in which 12 Western democracies agreed that “an armed attack against one or more…shall be considered an attack against them all,” he suggested that “professional thinkers—academics, public intellectuals, writers of any stripe” should sign a “Non-conformist Academic Treaty” in which they promise to come to each other’s defense if one of them is “called out” on social media or “investigated” by their employer. Among the victims of these modern-day witch-hunts Ferguson cited Bret Weinstein, Bruce Gilley, Nigel Biggar, Roland Fryer, Samuel Abrams, Peter Boghossian, Jordan Peterson, and Roger Scruton, and said the lesson was clear: “we either hang together or we hang separately.”

This struck me as an excellent idea, but I could also see a practical difficulty. One of the reasons NATO succeeded in deterring Soviet expansion into Western Europe is because it didn’t require any individual country to make the first move in response to Soviet aggression. Rather, NATO provided an institutional framework that enabled the signatories of the treaty to respond collectively, thereby pooling the risk. (To read more, click here.)

COMMENT | COMMENTS SO FAR: 0 [ FIXED LINK ] Bookmark and Share





Thursday 1st August 2019

Is Amy Wax a White Supremacist?


Click here to listen to my interview with Penn Law Professor Amy Wax, recently branded a ‘white supremacist’ as a result of her remarks at the National Conservatism conference, for Spectator USA.

COMMENT | COMMENTS SO FAR: 0 [ FIXED LINK ] Bookmark and Share





Thursday 1st August 2019

I'm considering joining the police – they need me!


I was driving to Gunnersbury Park last Sunday for my weekly 10K run when I caught the tail end of Broadcasting House on Radio 4. The presenter Paddy O’Connell was interviewing George King, the 19-year-old who scampered up the Shard at the beginning of July without the aid of ropes or suction cups. As you’d expect, he was impressive. He first set eyes on Britain’s tallest building as a 13-year-old on a school trip and decided then and there that he wanted to climb it. He embarked on years of rigorous training, taking up boxing and running a 62-mile ultramarathon. Last August, he became the first person to ‘free climb’ the world’s tallest climbing wall in Holland, and he then spent the past eight months reconnoitring the Shard — checking out the various security systems in different disguises. When the day came, it took him 45 minutes to scale the 310-metre building.

What really stood out in the interview, however, was his disdain for other members of his generation. ‘Programmes such as Love Island are reinforcing a very, I think, pathetic mentality for men,’ he said. When O’Connell asked him what experiences would stiffen their backbones, he said: ‘It’s about challenges, it’s about overcoming adversity, it’s about breaking through what you thought was impossible.’ This was music to my ears. Whenever I drone on about ‘snowflakes’, my wife and children take the mickey out of me, pointing out that grumpy old men have been complaining about the softness of the younger generation since the beginning of time. As for Love Island, whose latest series ended on Monday, they’re all huge fans. They’ve bought into the fashionable dogma that traditional masculinity is toxic and welcome the fact that the men on the show devote several hours a day to ‘personal grooming’ — including shaving off their body hair. In their eyes, there’s nothing wrong with these preening popinjays; they’re just in touch with their feminine side. So it was marvellous to hear a 19-year-old on Radio 4 echoing my most curmudgeonly views.

Further confirmation arrived this week when the Times ran a front page story headlined: 'Millennials? They aren’t much cop at police work.’ It revealed the Home Office has carried out a review into police recruitment, in which 244 officers and members of staff were interviewed, and concluded that today’s school leavers cannot cope with the demands of the job. ‘Participants gave examples of recruitment interviews where candidates had stated they do not like confrontation or were shocked by the need to work different shift patterns and possibilities of cancelled rest days,’ the report says. One senior officer complained about how millennials have been ‘wrapped up in cotton wool’, with the result that their mental health is too fragile to handle the day-to-day challenges of policing. (To read more, click here.)

COMMENT | COMMENTS SO FAR: 0 [ FIXED LINK ] Bookmark and Share





Thursday 1st August 2019

London Calling: Will the 'woke' Duchess bring down Britain's monarchy?


Will the Duchess of Sussex Bring Down Britain’s Monarchy? I discuss the catastrophe that is Meghan Markle and her mission to make the Royal Family ‘woke’ with James Delingpole in our latest podcast. We also talk about the men of Love Island – why the aversion to body hair? – and the difficulty Boris Johnson is going to have recruiting 20,000 additional police officers from General Snowflake. Click here to listen and don't forget to subscribe!

COMMENT | COMMENTS SO FAR: 0 [ FIXED LINK ] Bookmark and Share





Thursday 1st August 2019

Listen to me reading Cometh the Hour, Cometh the Man, my profile of Boris Johnson


Click here to listen to me reading Cometh the Hour, Cometh the Man, my long-form profile of Boris Johnson.

COMMENT | COMMENTS SO FAR: 0 [ FIXED LINK ] Bookmark and Share



 << Older Blog Entries     Blog Archive    


Twitter @beholdcosmicwav I talked about that in last week’s @calling_podcast with @JamesDelingpole. Have a listen here link  (2 hours ago)

BEST OF THE WEB

Cambridge and the exclusion of Jordan Peterson by Nigel Biggar - thearticle.com
The shocking truth about Jordan Peterson by Wesley Yang - tabletmag.com
The intellectual dark web by Bari Weiss - nytimes.com
How identity politics is harming the sciences by Heather Mac Donald - city-journal.org
The fall of the German Empire by Ross Douthat - nytimes.com
How Tom Wolfe became Tom Wolfe by Michael Lewis - Vanity Fair
The neuro-diversity case for free speech by Geoffrey Miller - quillette.com
The Age of Outrage by Jonathan Haidt - city-journal.org
The Warlock Hunt by Claire Berlinski - the-american-interest.com
Is classical liberalism conservative? by Yarom Hazony - jerusalemletters.com
The Implosion of Western Liberalism by Patrick Lee Miller - quillette.com
The Eton of the East End - Daily Mail
The reactionary temptation by Andrew Sullivan - nymag.com
The book that scandalised New York intellectuals by Louis Menand - newyorker.com
To understand Britain today, look to the 17th Century by Adrian Wooldridge - economist.com
The crisis in France by Christopher Caldwell - city-journal.org
A Visit to Michaela School by Patrick Alexander - prospectmagazine.co.uk
Why parenting may not matter by Brian Boutwell - quillette.com
Trump Establishment's Cultural Significance Explained by Michael Wolff - newsweek.com
Branching histories of the 2016 referendum by Dominic Cummings - dominiccummings.wordpress.com
Putin's Real Long Game by Molly K McKew - politico.com
The Flight 93 Election by Publius Decius Mus - claremont.org
How the education gap is tearing politics apart by David Runciman - theguardian.com
What's wrong with identity politics by Graeme Archer - conservativehome.com
Grammars and the grain of truth by Jonathan Porter
Anti-Brexit: Britain's new class war by John O'Sullivan - nationalreview.com
The English Revolt by Robert Tombs - newstatesman.com
Democracies end when they are too democratic by Andrew Sullivan - nymag.com
Human beings really are making progress by Steven Pinker - edge.org
What ISIS really wants by Graeme Wood - theatlantic.com
A society ripe for Submission by Douglas Murray - quadrant.org.au
Why I'm a Conservative Teacher by Jonathan Porter - conservativeteachers.com
Corbyn's Inconvenient Truth – He wanted the IRA to win - youtu.be
Why I've become Tory scum by Tony Parsons - gq-magazine.co.uk
Inside Westminster's free school - telegraph.co.uk
Robert Conquest obit - telegraph.co.uk
Jeremy Corbyn is not an anti-Semite – it's so much worse than that - news.stv.tv
 

BLOGROLL

Andrew Lilico
Andrew Sullivan
Arts and Letters Daily
Bagehot's Notebook
BBC News
BBC Sport
Benedict Brogan
Brendan O'Neill
Bruce Anderson
Coffee House
Conservative Home
Damian McBride
Damian Thompson
Dan Hodges
Daniel Hannon
Ed West
Frank Furedi
Guido Fawkes
Harry Phibbs
Iain Dale
Iain Martin
James Delingpole
James Wolcott
Joe Murphy
John Rentoul
Labour List
Mark Steyn
Matt Drudge
Mehdi Hasan
Melanie Phillips
Michael Wolff
Nick Cohen
Nick Robinson
Nikki Finke
Normblog
Paul Waugh
Peter Hitchens
Political Betting
Right Minds
Rob Long
Rod Liddle
Slate
Sophy Ridge
Stephen Pollard
The Arts Desk
The Corner
The Daily Beast
The First Post
The Omnivore
The Onion
Tim Shipman
Tim Stanley
Tom Shone
 

COLUMNISTS

AA Gill
Aidan Hartley
Allison Pearson
Allister Heath
AO Scott
Boris Johnson
Charles Moore
Cosmo Landesman
Daniel Finkelstein
David Brooks
Fraser Nelson
George Monbiot
Giles Coren
Henry Winter
James Delingpole
Jan Moir
Janan Ganesh
Jeremy Clarkson
Jeremy Warner
Jim White
Jonathan Freedland
Lloyd Evans
Manohla Dargis
Martin Samuel
Mary Ann Sieghart
Matthew d'Ancona
Matthew Norman
Maureen Dowd
Michiko Kakutani
Owen Jones
Patrick O'Flynn
Paul Krugman
Peter Bradshaw
Peter Oborne
Philip Collins
Polly Toynbee
Quentin Letts
Rachel Johnson
Rod Liddle
Roy Greenslade
Tim Montgomerie
Trevor Kavanagh
 
UK Book Cover

  • Buy the book on Amazon.co.uk

  • Buy the book on Amazon.com


  • UK Book Cover

  • Buy the book on Amazon.co.uk

  • Buy the book on Amazon.com


  • Audio Book Cover

  • Buy the audio book from
    Whole Story Audio
  • DVD Cover

  • Buy the DVD from Amazon.co.uk

  • Buy the DVD from Amazon.com


  • IMdb Page on the film